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Tech

Precise Bio opens ophthalmology facility to print eye tissue, including 3D corneas

31/01/2019
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Biotechnology company Precise Bio has opened an ophthalmology facility to advance its work in printing eye tissue and organs, including corneas.

The US-based regenerative medicine company aims to pioneer the use of bio-printed tissues and organs in patients, and has established a dedicated ophthalmic business unit in its Winston-Salem facility. In addition to its 4D bio-fabrication Platform, the unit aims to advance its 3D bio-printing research for eyes.

“As the first company to transplant a 3D printed corneal graft in animals, we are uniquely positioned to advance the use of bio-printed tissues in ophthalmology,” Precise Bio co-founder and CEO Mr Aryeh Batt said.

“There has been great excitement among physicians and commercial organisations about our disruptive technology to create eye-related tissues and its potential to transform the treatment of serious ophthalmic diseases and conditions.


"Precise Bio’s technology has the potential to truly transform the treatment of serious diseases, and to address the unmet needs in corneal replacement and other indications, which cannot be met by the limited number of donor tissues and organs."
Shay Soker, Co-founder of Precise Bio

“Establishing a business unit dedicated to realising this potential will support our future financing strategies and ensure that our financial resources are aligned with the tremendous power of our technology and intellectual property.”

Batt believes the ophthalmology market has an estimated cumulative value of US$10 billion (AU$14.1 billion).

His company has developed a laser-assisted 4D bio-fabrication technology platform for cell expansion and the production of complex tissues in what is said to be a highly reproducible method.

After being the first to transplant a 3D-printed cornea graft in animals, the company says analysis of the results supports the feasibility, safety and effectiveness of its technology, potentially leading to future human trials.

In addition to cornea grafts, other ophthalmic possibilities include retinal patch, vision correction lenticules, and solutions for ocular surface diseases.

“Precise Bio’s technology has the potential to truly transform the treatment of serious diseases, and to address the unmet needs in corneal replacement and other indications, which cannot be met by the limited number of donor tissues and organs,” Dr Shay Soker, professor at the Wake Forest Institute of Regenerative Medicine and a co-founder of Precise Bio, said.

“The company’s technology overcomes multiple challenges in scalable, reproducible manufacturing of bio-printed tissues and organs, and positions Precise Bio for leadership in the field of regenerative medicine.”






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