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Research

Eylea shown to reverse diabetic retinopathy in some cases

07/05/2018
Regeneron’s injectable eye drug Eylea (aflibercept) effectively treated some cases of non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) during recently completed Phase III clinical trials.

The topline results for the 24-week Panorama trial showed 58% of participants who received the treatment experienced a two-step or greater improvement from baseline on the Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Scale (DRSS) at week 24, compared to 6% of patients who received the sham injection.


"This is the first time a therapy has demonstrated it can reverse disease progression in patients,"
Dr George Yancopoulos, Regeneron president and chief scientific officer

“This is the first time a therapy has demonstrated it can reverse disease progression in patients with moderately severe to severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy without diabetic macular oedema, in a trial specifically designed to study this population,” Regeneron president and chief scientific officer Dr George Yancopoulos said.

“Patients in the trial continue to be evaluated to determine if Eylea can prevent progression to neovascular vision-threatening complications or diabetic macular oedema. We look forward to sharing one-year results later this year.”

The two-year Panorama trial recruited 402 patients and patients were administered on average 4.4 injections during the first 24 weeks. Trials were designed with three treatment arms – two active treatment groups and one observational sham injection group.

The two Eylea groups started with either three or five initial monthly doses, and the trial will evaluate every eight-week dosing or every 16-week dosing at one year.

Aside from assessing the efficacy of the treatment of NPDR, secondary endpoints of the trials also include the assessment of Eylea in the prevention of neovascular sight-impacting complications, impacts on other anatomic effects, visual acuity improvement and safety.

The results of the Panorama trials will form the basis of a Biologics License Application (BLA) with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

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