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New lens able to slow and sometimes stop myopia

13/06/2018By Matthew Woodley • Staff Journalist
Hoya has announced it is preparing to release a new type of ophthalmic lens that should slow myopia progression significantly.

The MyoSmart with Defocus Incorporated Multiple Segments (DIMS) Technology was developed in conjunction with Hong Kong Polytechnic University, and is designed to provide myopia control in children and teenagers. According to Hoya, a two-year double-blind randomised clinical trial involving 160 Chinese myopic children aged 8–13, found that wearing the spectacles daily significantly slowed myopia progression and axial elongation.


“With the DIMS Spectacle Lens, we are able to put in many micro-lenses all over the surface of the ophthalmic lens. When the eye moves around different regions of the spectacle lens, the eye still experiences a constant amount of myopic defocus.”
To Chi-ho, Hong Kong Polytechnic

Following the trial, which began in 2014, children wearing defocus lenses had 60% less myopia progression, while myopia progression halted completely in 21.5% of cases.

The lens, which has a smooth surface and looks almost identical to a regular lens, comprises of a central optical zone for correcting refractive and multi-segments of constant myopic defocus surrounding the central zone, extending to mid-periphery of the lens. According to one of its inventors, Professor To Chi-ho, the lens provides clear vision and myopic defocus for vision correction simultaneously for the wearer at all viewing distances.

To added that the lens makes use of the natural homeostatic mechanism known as ‘emmetropisation’, whereby the eyeball adapts and shapes to receive focused images as it does for normal vision.

“We have tried to incorporate myopic defocus optics into different treatment modalities, such as contact lens. For spectacle lens, the challenge is the eye will move behind the spectacle lens and therefore the myopic defocus optics has to be incorporated all over the lens,” To said.

“With the DIMS Spectacle Lens, we are able to put in many micro-lenses all over the surface of the ophthalmic lens. When the eye moves around different regions of the spectacle lens, the eye still experiences a constant amount of myopic defocus.”

The lenses will be launched in Hong Kong and China in the summer of 2018, while a broader, global launch – including Australia – is slated to begin in 2019/2020.

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