Australia's Leading Ophthalmic Magazine Since 1975

     Free Sign Up     

Australia's Leading Ophthalmic Magazine Since 1975

     Free Sign Up     
Research

Low cost dye in contact lenses used to treat colour blindness

04/06/2018
Contact lenses treated with low cost dye are being hailed as a potentially simple solution for treating colour blindness, thanks to a group of researchers at the University of Birmingham.

The team of scientists infused soft contact lenses with a non-toxic rhodamine derivative dye known for its ability to absorb certain wavelengths of light in the optical spectrum.


"Contact lenses are of interest for colour blindness correction because it is easier to correct the entire field of view."
Dr Haider Butt, University of Birmingham

By doing this, they were able to block the band that lies between the red and green wavelengths, which is perceived by two sets of corresponding optical cones simultaneously, and enable better differentiation between red and green colours.

While no cure for colour vision deficiency (CVD) exists, several methods have already been used to increase the colour perception of those affected.

However, according to the team current products on the market such as colour filtering glasses are expensive, bulky and incompatible with other vision corrective glasses.

“Contact lenses are of interest for colour blindness correction because it is easier to correct the entire field of view. The dye processing we carried out does not need any complex preparation, it is not toxic to the human eye, and our method could be easily used in both glasses and contact lenses at low cost,” lead researcher Dr Haider Butt said.

Contact lense treated with low cost dye
Contact lense treated with low cost dye

The researchers tested the lens on people with red-green CVD by applying the dyed contact lens on a glass slide. Participants were then asked to look at Ishihara test templates through the dyed lens and note whether they saw any improvements in their colour perception.

The positive results were published in Advanced Healthcare Materials and further patient studies are also already underway.

“We are now looking into using a similar process to correct purple-blue colour blindness, and also to bring together a number of dyes to make lenses perform for both red-green and purple-blue colour blindness simultaneously. We are about to commence human clinical trials shortly,” Butt added.

largeleaderboard_0817
advertisement


standardlarge_0218
advertisement
Editor's Suggestion
Hot Stories

AND/OR
 

Subscribe for Insight in your Inbox

Get Insight with the latest in industry news, trends, new products, services and equipment!